Energy Northwest CEO announces plans to retire

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Mark Reddeman plans to step down in June 2018

Energy Northwest’s CEO has announced plans to retire in a year.

Mark Reddemann announced his June 2018 retirement plans in an email to employees June 28, following his notification of the Energy Northwest executive board during a regularly scheduled meeting in Portland, Oregon.

Mark Reddeman
Mark Reddeman

“It has been an honor and privilege to be a part of the Energy Northwest team. I have worked in this industry for almost 40 years and this has been the most rewarding position of my career,” Reddemann wrote in his email. “I have enjoyed working with all of you and have been pleased with our growth as we pursue excellence in everything we do.”

Reddemann joined the agency based north of Richland in 2010 to lead an organization of more than 1,100 employees; and oversee the operation of Columbia Generating Station, the third largest generator of electricity in Washington state, and Energy Northwest’s non-nuclear projects, which include wind, hydroelectric and solar facilities.

Prior to assuming his current position, Reddemann was vice president of operations support at Xcel Energy, during which he also served on the Energy Northwest Corporate Nuclear Safety Review Board.

After his arrival, Reddemann brought together Energy Northwest’s current senior leadership team and focused the organization on achieving excellence in performance. The effort yielded positive results: Columbia set electricity generation records in 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2016 while being recognized for safety performance by regional and national power organizations, and reducing Columbia’s cost-of-power.

Last year, the Association of Washington Business named Energy Northwest its employer of the year.

“We’ve gone through a lot of change in the last seven years. What stands out to me is improved teamwork across the agency, your pride of ownership in our accomplishments and our focus on achieving excellence in safety, reliability, predictability and cost-effectiveness,” Reddemann wrote to employees.

Sid Morrison, Energy Northwest executive board chair, appointed a committee to facilitate the selection of Reddemann’s successor.

“We owe Mark our gratitude for his strong and thoughtful leadership of the agency over these past seven years,” Morrison said. “In this our 60th year of operation, Energy Northwest is stronger than ever in its service to our public power members. Mark’s role in getting us to this point cannot be understated.”

Reddemann will work with the board’s committee to identify his successor.

Reddemann worked for nearly 40 years in the nuclear energy industry. From 2005 to 2006 he was vice president of Nuclear Assessment at Nuclear Management Company. Before that position, he was vice president of Plant Technical Support at the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, following positions as vice president of Engineering at NMC, and site vice president at NMC’s Kewaunee and Point Beach nuclear power plants. He also worked at several nuclear plants across the country, including Hope Creek, Salem, Columbia and Prairie Island.

Reddemann serves on the New Brunswick Power Board of Directors; Tri-City Development Council Board; Association of Washington Business Executive Committee and Board of Directors; and the Nuclear Energy Institute Executive Committee and Board of Directors. He plans to continue his service to industry and community organizations following his retirement.